Posted : 8 years ago

The world’s largest coins, in size and standard value, were copper plates used in Alaska around 1850. They were about a metre (3 ft) long, half-a-metre (about 2 ft) wide, weighed 40 kg (90 lb), and were worth $2,500.

In 2000, Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands is the second wealthiest woman, with $5,2 billion.

Australians are the heaviest gamblers in the world; an estimated 82% of Australians bet. That is twice as much per capita as Europeans or Americans. Yet, Australia, with less than 1% of the world population, has 20% of the world’s poker machines.

A third of the world’s people live on less than $2 a day, with 1,2 billion people living on less than $1 a day.

In the 1400s, global income rose only 0,1% per year; today it often tops 5%.

..:: More Great Stuff ::..

Posted : 8 years ago

Of the more than $50 billion worth of diet products sold every year, almost $20 billion are spent on imitation fats and sugar substitutes.

Statistics show that people with high, medium and low income groups spend about the same amount on Christmas gifts.

Small-time gamblers who place small bet in order to prolong the excitement of a game are called “dead fish” by game operators because the longer the playing time, the greater the chances of losing.

The income gap between the richest fifth of the world’s people and the poorest measured by average national income per head increased from 30 to one in 1960, to 74 to one in 1998.

Annual global spending on education is $80 billion.

Tobacco is a $200 billion industry, producing six trillion cigarettes a year – about 1,000 cigarettes for each person on earth.